Crocheted Snowflake Table Runner

By: Mary Jane Protus for Red Heart Yarn

Crocheted Snowflake Table Runner-1Runner measures 57″ long x 14″ wide.

Materials:

 RED HEART® “Holiday”: 2 skeins 1360 Aran with Gold.

 Crochet Hook: 5.5mm US [I-9].

 Yarn needle.

Gauge: Snowflake measures 5½” x 5½” measured point to point. CHECK YOUR GAUGE. Use any size hook to obtain the gauge.

CENTER STRIP

First Snowflake

Ch 4, join with slip st to form a ring.

Round 1 (right side): Ch 5 (counts as hdc, ch 3), [hdc,ch 3] 5 times in ring; join with slip st in 2nd ch of beginning ch-5—6 ch-3 spaces.

Round 2: Ch 1, sc in same st as joining, (2 sc, ch 5, 2 sc) in next ch-3 space, *sc in next hdc, (2 sc, ch 5, 2 sc) in next ch-3 space; repeat from * around; join with slip st in first sc—6 ch-5 spaces.

Round 3: Ch 1, sc in first sc, *ch 3, [sc, ch 5, sc, ch 7 (point), sc, ch 5, sc] in 3rd ch of next ch-5 space, ch 3, skip next 2 sc**, sc in next sc; repeat from * around, ending last repeat at **, join with slip st in first sc—6 ch-7 points. Fasten off.

Second Snowflake (2 points joined)

Rounds 1-2: Repeat rounds 1-2 of first snowflake.

Round 3: Ch 1, sc in first sc, *ch 3, (sc, ch 5, sc, ch 3) in 3rd ch of next ch-5 space, with wrong sides together, slip st in corresponding ch-7 point on previous snowflake, ch 3, (sc, ch 5, sc) in same ch of ch-5 space on current snowflake, ch 3, skip next 2 sc, sc in next sc, repeat * once; **ch 3, (sc, ch 5, sc, ch 7, sc, ch 5, sc) in 3rd ch of next ch-5 space, ch 3, skip next 2 sc***, sc in next sc; repeat from ** around, ending last repeat at ***, join with slip st in first sc. Fasten off.

Third through Twelfth Snowflake

Work 10 more snowflakes same as second snowflake, joining in a strip, skipping 1 point on each side of snowflakes.

FIRST SIDE STRIP

First Snowflake (3 points joined)

Rounds 1-2: Repeat rounds 1-2 of first snowflake.

Round 3: Ch 1, sc in first sc, *ch 3, (sc, ch 5, sc, ch 3) in 3rd ch of next ch-5 space, with wrong sides together, slip st in first ch-7 space on top snowflake on center strip to the right of joining, ch 3, (sc, ch 5, sc) in same ch of ch-5 space on current snowflake, ch 3, skip next 2 sc, sc in next sc, repeat * twice, joining with slip st to junction between 2 snowflakes, then joining to next ch-7 point; **ch 3, (sc, ch 5, sc, ch 7, sc, ch 5, sc) in 3rd ch of next ch-5 space, ch 3, skip next 2 sc***, sc in next sc; repeat from ** around, ending last repeat at ***, join with slip st in first sc. Fasten off.

Crocheted Snowflake Table Runner-2Second Snowflake (4 points joined)

Rounds 1-2: Repeat rounds 1-2 of first snowflake.

Round 3: Ch 1, sc in first sc, *ch 3, (sc, ch 5, sc, ch 3) in 3rd ch of next ch-5 space, with wrong sides together, slip st in corresponding ch-7 space on previous snowflake on same strip, ch 3, (sc, ch 5, sc) in same ch of ch-5 space on current snowflake, ch 3, skip next 2 sc, sc in next sc, repeat * 3 times, joining with slip st to next 2 junctions between 2 snowflakes, then joining to next ch-7 point; **ch 3, (sc, ch 5, sc,ch 7, sc, ch 5, sc) in 3rd ch of next ch-5 space, ch 3, skip next 2 sc***, sc in next sc; repeat from ** around, ending last repeat at ***, join with slip st in first sc. Fasten off.

Third through Eleventh Snowflake

Work 9 more snowflakes same as second snowflake, joining in a strip across side of center strip, following assembly diagram for placement.

SECOND SIDE STRIP

Make and join 11 more snowflakes joining to center strip same as first side strip, following assembly diagram for placement.

FINISHING

Weave in ends.

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Quilted Table Covers

Quilted Table Covers-1Quilting adds body to table coverings and provides additional protection for table surfaces. The thickness and slight puffiness of quilted table accessories also adds visual appeal. Use quilted fabrics for placemats, table runners and table mats. Finish edges with bias binding.

Pre-quilted fabrics are available, but quilting your own fabric provides the luxury of coordinating colors , and prints, and the economy of making only the amount of quilted fabric needed for a project. The quilting guide foot with the attached guide bar makes the channel quilting process easy.

Lengthen the stitch length and loosen the pressure for even quilting. Begin by stitching the center quilting row,and work toward the sides.

Use polyester fleece or needle punched batting for tabletop fashions. It will retain its shape and body when laundered.

How to Machine Quilt Fabric Using a Quilter Bar

Quilted Table Covers-2

1) Cut fabric, fleece and lining slightly larger than finished size of item. Place fleece between wrong sides of fabric and lining. Pin or baste all three layers together.

2) Mark first quilting line in center of fabric with yardstick and chalk pencil. (If not using quilter bar, mark every quilting rowan equal distance apart.)

3) Stitch center line. Determine the distance to next quilting line: Adjust quilter bar to follow the previous row of stitching as you stitch the next row.

 

{Credit} Singer sewing for the Home (copyright 1984-1988)

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Asymmetric Designs

All of the foregoing patterns were designed for a balanced effect, that is, half a pattern to be cut on a fold of fabric. When opened out, the darts will be exactly the same on either side of the center front or back. This is a formal or symmetrical balance (Fig. 18a). It is the one most generally used in clothing design.

Balance can be achieved in another way. The right and left sides may be different though equal. This is a balance of uneven parts, a “felt” balance, and the type most seen in nature. It is called an informal or asymmetrical balance (Fig. 18b). In clothing design, this is a more sophisticated type of balance and requires great skill in handling. It is so easy to push it to a point of imbalance.

Asymmetric Designs-1

TO MAKE THE PATTERN FOR FIGURE I8b

1. Use two bodice-front slopers fastened at center front with Scotch tape (Fig. 18c). Asymmetric patterns must be developed from a complete sloper.

2. Close both waistline darts and fasten them with Scotch tape creating a complete bulging block.

3. Rest the bulging block on the table and draw the position of the darts on the inside of the pattern. It is easier to work on the inside of the bulge. The right dart starts at the right side seam and goes to the right dart point. The left dart starts at the right side seam and goes to the left dart point. Make the two dart lines parallel to each other; they’ll look prettier that way (Fig. 18d).

4. Slash the new dart lines so the pattern opens out fiat (Fig. 18e).

Note that the left dart appears larger. This is only because it is longer.

In reality, the amount of dart control is equal in both darts. Were the right dart extended to the same length as the left dart it would appear the same size (Fig. 18f).

BULGING BLOCK TO THE RESCUE

If ever you are puzzled about what to do with a dart while you are developing a new design use the bulging block method. It is an easy way to eliminate any darts that get in the way of the new style lines. There is another method for freeing the area of darts in a fiat pattern while designing. Shift them temporarily to an out-of-the-way position.

 

STRUCTURAL DESIGN VS. ADDED DECORATION

When it comes to designing (any form of designing) there are two current schools of thought. One believes in the beauty of undisguised structure, purity of line, handsome materials. The other doesn’t go along with this austerity. It prefers the enrichment of additional ornamentation.

dart control

Both are acceptable in clothing design. There are outstanding designers in each category. If you are a purist, then continue to be; you are in good company. Should you prefer to gild the lily-a little or a lot-you’ll be right in the swing of present fashion. Often some discreet detail consistent with the structural line can provide added interest.

In Fig. 19a, the neck dart is emphasized with topstitching.

In Fig . 19b, ribbon ending in a tiny, flat bow has been superimposed on the dart concealing the structure.

In Fig. 19c, a curved welt has been inserted into the curved dart.

In Fig. 19d, both bodice and skirt close on the darts.

SHAPING SHOULD SUIT THE FABRIC, TOO

When you are using a solid-color fabric, the position of the dart control is no problem.

Asymmetric Designs-3

Your chief concern in deciding dart placement is which best carries out your design idea. When you are using a figured material-a spaced print of either large or small units-a stripe, a check, a plaid; a visible vertical or horizontal weave; a diagonal weave or print-then the choice of dart position becomes more complex.

Any dart when stitched into the garment will interrupt the continuity of the fabric design. Therefore, you must choose darts which will do so with the least disturbing effect.

Consider the simple vertical waistline dart.

In a solid color fabric, the dart shows clearly and effectively and can even be a part of the design (Fig. 20a).

The waistline dart in Fig. 20b cuts right into the floral motif of the fabric. How silly when this is the chief beauty of the dress. A better solution would be to shift the darts to an area that contains no design unit.

In a horizontally striped fabric, the horizontal stripes, easily matched, are little affected by the vertical waistline dart (Fig. 20c).


Asymmetric Designs-2A chevron design results when vertically striped material is stitched in a vertical dart (Fig. 20d). Whether this is objectionable or not depends on the nature of the stripes.

Fabrics with diagonal stripes are just plain difficult. When a vertical dart is stitched into the diagonal print or weave the resulting distortion is vivid (Fig. 20e). No darts or darts that follow the diagonal line of the fabric are possible solutions.

The French underarm dart with its long diagonal line is a problem in some fabrics.

In a solid color, the line is striking (Fig. 21a).

The diagonal stripe of the bias bodice of Fig. 21b can be worked into a pleasing little design.

The diagonal line of the French underarm dart in a horizontal or vertical stripe, a check or plaid, results in a complete mismatching of the fabric design (Fig. 21c) .

If you are planning to use a diagonal fabric, make the stripes an integral part of the design (Fig. 22).

Asymmetric Designs-4When a commercial pattern says, “Striped, plaid, or obvious diagonal fabrics are not suitable,” better heed the admonition. The professional pattern ‘makers know whereof they speak. The pattern has been carefully tested for the effect of the darts on the fabric.

THE MORAL IS CLEAR

If fabric is the inspiration for your design, use darts that will be consistent with the surface design of the material. If you start with your pattern design, choose fabric that will best conform to the position of the darts.

 

 

 

 

 

Asymmetric Designs-5LOOK, MA, NO DARTS

Dart control need not be a dart! Any device will,’do as long as it “takes in” the amount needed to make the garment fit the smaller measurement and “lets it out” at the right place to fit the larger measurement. A pleat (Fig. 23a), gathering (Fig. 23b), smocking (Fig. 23c) will work just as well as darts and often with more interest.

When you plan to use the dart control for gathers (or shirring or smocking) the amount of the control must be spread over a wider area. Were you to limit your gathering to the space allotted to the

dart, you would have to draw up the entire amount so as not to alter the length of the original seam line. Can you imagine the impossible bunching that would result? Here is how to remedy the situation.

{Credit} Design Your Own Dress Patterns

Adele P. Margolis

 

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Country Kitchen

Country Kitchen-1Framed in cookie jar, skillet, or canning jar shapes, these designs will give your kitchen down-home appeal.

Apples Size: 3 – 1/2 “w X 6-3/4″ h

Cow Size: 7-1/8″w x 7-1/8″h

Geese Size: 8 -1/4 “w x 6-1/4 ” h

Supplies: Worsted weight yarn (refer to color key), one 10-5/8″ x 13-5/8″ sheet of

7 mesh plastic canvas, #16 tapestry needle, frame, and 8″ of ‘ 1/8″ w red satin ribbon (for Geese only)

Stitches Used: Backstitch, Cross Stitch, French Knot, Gobelin Stitch, and Tent Stitch Instructions: Insert unworked piece of plastic canvas into frame to check size before stitching. Trim canvas to fit frame if necessary. Follow chart and use required stitches to work piece. Complete background with blue Tent Stitches as shown on chart. Insert stitched piece into frame.

For Cow only: Cut four 8″ lengths of black yarn. Knot three yarn lengths together close to one end. Thread loose ends of yarn through canvas at . Braid yarn for l-1/2 “. Tie remaining yarn length around end of braid to secure. Trim ends to 1/4″. For Geese only: Thread 8″ of 1/8″ w ribbon through canvas at Tie ribbon in a bow and trim ends.

Created by Readiris, Copyright IRIS 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Eye – Catching Case

Eye – Catching Case-1This handy sunglasses case is the cat’s meow! Featuring a cute, eye-catching design, it’s

perfect for protecting glasses from dirt and scratches.

Size: 6-3/4 “w x 3-3/4″ h

Supplies: Worsted weight yarn (refer to color key), one 10-5/8″ x 13-5/8″ sheet of 7 mesh plastic canvas, and #16 tapestry needle

Stitches Used: Backstitch, Overcast Stitch, and Tent Stitch

Instructions: Follow chart and use required stitches to work Sunglasses

Case pieces, Use color to match stitching area to join Front to Back along long edges and one short edge, Work

black Overcast Stitches to cover remaining unworked edges.

 

 

Eye – Catching Case-2

 

 

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Curved Darts

Curved Darts-1Darts need not always be straight lines. They may be curved for interest. For instance, a French underarm dart looks quite pretty when it is a curved rather than a straight line (Fig. 16).

1. On the cut-out sloper with the cut-out dart, locate the position of the new dart. Mark the point A.

2. Draw a curved line from A to the dart point. You may draw

the line freehand for eye appeal, then true the line with an appropriate curved instrument or you may draw directly with any of the instru¬ments that may have a curve that appeals to you (Fig. 16a).

3.Slash the curved dart line.

4.Close the original dart, shifting the control to the new curved

dart (Fig. 16b). Fasten with Scotch tape.

Convert this pattern into a bulging block. Compare it with your original waistline-dart block. Does the curve make any difference in the amount of control? None, whatever. You merely have a new design that utilizes the original control.

Just for fun, go back and try all the darts you’ve done with curved instead of straight lines.

The curves may even be compound rather than simple (Fig. 17).

Curved Darts-2

ASYMMETRIC DESIGNS

All of the foregoing patterns were designed for a balanced effect, that is, half a pattern to be cut on a fold of fabric. When opened out, the darts will be exactly the same on either side of the center front or back. This is a formal or symmetrical balance (Fig. 18a). It is the one most generally used in clothing design.

Balance can be achieved in another way. The right and left sides may be different though equal. This is a balance of uneven parts, a “felt” balance, the type most seen in nature. It is called an informal or asymmetrical balance (Fig. 18b). In clothing design, this is a more sophisticated type of balance and requires great skill in handling. It is so easy to push it to a point of imbalance.

 

{Credit} Design Your Own Dress Patterns

Adele P. Margolis

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Restyle a T-Shirt into a Ruffly Cardigan

From Craftstylish - cal patch

Restyle a T-Shirt into a Ruffly Cardigan-1Vintage bed jackets are beautiful but harder and harder to find in thrift stores these days. Why not make your own bed jacket-inspired cardigan out of an old T-shirt? Restyling is so timely right now; you get a new, fun piece to wear, it doesn’t cost anything, AND you’re putting something to use that hasn’t seen the light of day for ages. This sweet little number is the perfect cardi to throw on over a dress or tank when the weather warms up, which I’m told will happen again some day!

 

All you need is a T-shirt that approximately fits (a little big is OK), some scissors, thread, chalk or marking pen, and your sewing machine. Note: You may need a second tee if your shirt isn’t very long to get enough fabric for the ruffles.

Read More

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There’s an art to a Dart

There is a folklore that tells of someone’s mother or great aunt or clever little dressmaker who could cut out any garment without a pattern. Like many a myth there is an element of truth in the story. anyone-amateur or professional-who sews a great deal can be so familiar with the shape of a sleeve or a collar or a neckline that she can cut from memory. Some day you, too, may be able to do this. In the meantime, there’s safety in sticking with patterns.

There’s an art to a Dart-4PATTERN WHYS

A pattern is fiat while you are not. And thereby hangs a tale. The body has height, width, and depth. Within this roughly cylindrical framework there are a series of secondary curves and bulges. In a woman’s body there are eight such bulges (each with its high point) which concern the pattern maker (Fig. 1). .

(l) bust, (2) abdomen, (3) side hip, (4) buttocks, (5) upper shoulder blades, (6) lower shoulder blades, (7) elbow, (8) dowager’s hump (back of neck).

No matter how much or how little you have of any of the above, the problem remains the same. The pattern must provide enough length and width of fabric to cover the high poThere’s an art to a Dart-2ints (where the body is fullest, the measurement is largest, the fabric requirements are greatest) while at the same time providing some means of con¬trolling the excess of material in a smaller adjoining area. Dart control is the means by which this is accomplished. It is the basis of all flat patterns.

It is not magic, nor wizardry, but dart control that converts a flat length of cloth into a three-dimensional form which fits the con¬tours of the body. Dart control always represents a relationship. It is the difference between a larger measurement and a smaller one. For instance, if the bust measures 35 inches and the waistline 27 inches, the dart control necessary to shape the There’s an art to a Dart-3bodice is 8 inches. If the waist measures 27 inches and the hips 37 inches, the dart control necessary to shape the skirt is 10 inches. The greater the difference, the larger the amount of control. The smaller the difference the smaller the amount of control.

It is not whether a figure is short or tall, heavy or slim, which determines the amount of shaping or dart control. It is always the relationship between two adjoining measurements. For example, a petite figure with a 22-inch waist and 27 -inch hips needs 5 inches for the skirt dart control. So does a heavy figure with a 38-inch waist and 43-inch hips (Fig. 2).

There is this, too: the larger the amount of stitched dart control, the greater the resulting

There’s an art to a Dart-1bulge. The smaller the amount of stitched dart control, the less the resulting bulge. This means that the shaping will be greater in those areas of the body that have the greatest need. Gentler shaping is reserved for those areas where the needs are less.

All of this vital information-the amount and the placement of the dart control-is contained in the five pieces of a sloper (basic pattern or foundation pattern) (Fig. 3).

Note that the total amount of dart control is divided three ways; front, back, and side. In the bodice, since the bust needs the most shaping, the largest amount of control is placed in front. In the skirt, since the buttocks require the most shaping, the largest amount of control is placed in the back. If you place the front and back bodices and skirts side by side so that the center fronts and center backs are parallel to each other, you can readily see the dart control on the side seams (Fig. 4)
{Credit} Design Your Own Dress Patterns

Adele P. Margolis

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Scarf Pillows

Scarf Pillows-1Most dorm beds also double as a couch (and study nook,and eating area), so why not spruce up the bottom bunk with a few fun scarf pillows? Simply hit the nearest Savers/Value Village and find a few old throw pillows, then check out the accessories section for scarves in bright prints and bold colors – vintage scarves look exceptionally chic. You’ll have an upscale look for just a few bucks.

Cost:

• $4.99 Scarf

• $1.99 Pillow

You Will Need:

• 1 large scarf

• 1 medium sized throw pillow

Other supplies:

• Scrap pieces of construction paper or lightweight cardboard to draw templates

• Clear contact paper (available at office and home improvement stores)

• Double-sided tape

• Ruler or tape measure

• Scissors

• Pencil

Instructions:

Step 1: Hand wash scarf and air dry. Lightly iron scarf if needed.

Step 2: Lay scarf fl at on table or floor, then place pillow on the scarf so pillow edges are perpendicular to

scarf edges (see image).

Step 4: Tie together two opposite ends of the scarf across the length of the pillow.

Step 5: Tie remaining ends of scarf together.

Step 6: Pull ends from the first knot out and fluff pillow.

project from: http://www.savers.com/

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How to make multiple dart tucks at the neckline

How to make multiple dart tucks at the neckline-11. Trace the bodice-front sloper. Cut out the tracing and the dart.

2. Lightly draw an arc as a guideline for positioning the dart tucks (Fig. 56a). Make it a distance from the neckline equal to the length you desire for the dart tucks. They may be of equal length or graduated.

3. Draw the lines for the dart tucks showing the number and the position of each one. Designate the point at which the stitching is to end (Fig. 56a).

4. Connect the ends of the dart tucks with the original dart point (Fig. 56a). All lines from neck to dart point (crooked though they are) become slash lines.

5. Close the waistline dart in whole or in part (Fig. 55b), throwing the dart control to the shoulder. Fasten with Scotch tape.

6. Arrange the sections so the spaces between are equal (Fig.55b).

7. Trace the pattern. When you come to the dart tucks, trace only to the end of each tuck as designated in Step 2 (Fig. 55c).

Notice that the dart tuck legs are not parallel lines. Being parts of darts, they are tapered. They must be stitched so.

How to make multiple dart tucks at the neckline-28. Fold the tucks into position (the same rule as for darts).

Trace the shoulder seam (Fig. 55c). Working with stiff paper in a small pattern makes this somewhat difficult because the dart tucks are so tiny. Trace the construction pattern to either tissue paper or a paper napkin. You’ll find them much easier to manipulate for folds.

9. Complete the pattern.

 

 

{Credit} Design Your Own Dress Patterns

Adele P. Margolis

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